Charlestown in The Swinford Union (part 4) in Co. Mayo

Swinford Union meeting on the 10th of April 1917

In the chair: J Marren, J P, Other Guardians present were: E H Dolphin, M C Henry, J Mulligan, J A Mellett, M F Campbell, J McHugh, T Marren, P Deacy, J Morrisroe, M Dunleavy, J Gallagher and M Murphy. In the year 1916-1917 Mr J Garvey of Sonnagh, was the Relieving officer for the Charlestown area. No other minutes were reported.

Swinford Union meeting on the 8th of September 1917

At the meeting Mr John Comer, Swinford stated that he was directed by Swinford Sinn Fein club to forward the resolution, which he enclosed and to request that the matter be placed before the Board of Guardians at their next meeting.

The resolution referred to was: We call upon the Guardians of the Swinford Union to expunge from the minutes, the resolution of the 9th of May 1916, condemming the action of the brave men who took part in the Rebellion of Easter week.

They, Sinn Fein, could not understand how any body of Irishmen calling themselves Nationalists, could condemn their Country men who gave up their lives for Irish Freedom.

The resolution was proposed by the Chairman, Mr Campbell, and seconded by Mr P O'Hara. It was then put to the meeting and passed. The following note was written across the resolution of the 9th of May 1916: Expunge from Minute book.

Swinford Union meeting of Guardians on the 25th of September 1917

In the Chair: J Marren, J P, Other Guardians present were: T Kearney, J Parsons, J A Mulligan, J Reid, Cloonamna, E Geever, M C Henry, J P McDonnell, D Grogan, P J O'Brien, F Davey, P O'Hara, R Barrett, F Brennan, M F Campbell, T Rogers, R Folliard, T Waldron, D J Murtagh, E P Irwin, T F Keane and M Murphy.

At this meeting the tender of Mr Michael Mulligan of Swinford for the supply of the following articles of clothing was accepted:

  • Linen sheeting per yard : Three shillings and six pence

  • Shirts for men, each: Three shillings and three pence

  • Flannelette per yard: Ten pence

  • Irish tweed per yard: Three shillings and Six pence

  • Corduroy per yard: Two shillings and Six pence

  • Saddler's thread per pound: Six pence

  • Men's caps, each: One shilling

  • Boy's caps, each: Ten pence

Mr James Dolphin's tender for Bread at Nine pence and a half penny per four pound loaf was accepted. Mrs Mary McNicholas's tender for the supply of milk at One shilling and eight pence per gallon was accepted.

Minutes of Swinford Union meeting on the 9th of October 1917

Gentlemen, I have sold two of the Workhouse pigs for twenty three pounds. I purchased three store pigs at a cost of Fourteen pounds and and five shillings. I have lodged to the credit of the Union the following:

  • Sale of Pigs: Twenty two pounds and eighteen shillings

  • Balance of Cheque from purchase of pigs: Fourteen shillings and six pence

  • Payment of relief: Twenty pounds, three shillings and three pence

  • Total: Forty three pounds, fifteen shillings and nine pence.

    Your obedient servant, O McNicholas.

Swinford Union meeting on the 6th of November 1917

In the Chair, J Marren, Others present were: M C Henry, E Geever, J Mulligan, J Parsons, P Deacy, P O'Hara, P Grennan, F Brennan, M Dunleavy, P Doohan, R Folliard, P Healy, M Murphy, D J Murtagh, J McDonnell, T Kearney, J Reid, E P Irwin, J A Mellett, D Byrne, M F Campbell, T O Hunt, father of Owen B Hunt of Doocastle and Philadelphia, and T Roughneen.

There were no minutes reported.

Swinford Union meeting on the 11th of June 1918

Proposed by the Chairman P O'Hara and seconded by Mr Campbell, that we protest against the action of the English Government in the imprisoning and deporting of Irish men and Irish women without giving them a fair and public trial. We demand in the interest of humanity, that Irish prisoners be treated in a humane manner and that a representation of a Neutral Nation be requested to visit the the Prisoners and report of their treatment in English prison cells, and demand their release or be given a fair trial before a Jury of their Countrymen.

In the meantime, to see that the prisoners get the privilege of communicating with their friends. We think it a public scandal that a Country which professes to be the saviour of small Nations, should at this stage of the war, confine and persecute for no cause but for loving their Country, and in order that it may take its place once more among the Nations of the Earth.

© Cathal Henry December 2002