Local Historical Sites

Castlehag Island

The original castle on this was of rough construction. It was destroyed by King Felim O'Connor in the early 13th Century.

Castle Island

This castle was founded by the sons of Rory O'Connor and was destroyed by Felim O'Connor at the same time as the castle on Hag Island.

Ancient Causeways

On Lough Carra you will find different types of causeway. There is the wooded type and the stone type. Some of the stone type are under the water. They date back to 1000BC and 1500BC approx and what is left of them can still be seen to this day.

Doon Wood

It has been recently discovered that this peninsula was a promontory fort. You can see that a wall crossed it at its narrowest point. A self-guided tour of archaeological remains dating back to the late Bronze Age is provided. The development of this trail won the Interpret Ireland Award in 1996.

Castlecarra

The castle was built some time between 1238 and 1300 by Adam Staunton. The family later took on the name McEvilly. The McEvillys were major chiefs in the area and had another castle at Kanturk near Ballinrobe. In the late 16th century it was acquired by a Captain Bowen and it remained in his family until 1641. The present ruins consist of a tower building surrounded by an impressive moat pleasantly overlooking Lough Carra.

Church Island

St Finan founded a church on this island in the 7th century. St Patrick is supposed to have banished nine goblins to Church Island. At the moment the Church is being rebuilt by Ballintubber Trust as a place of pilgrimage.

Castleburke

This castle was built by OFlaherty. In 1611 it passed on to Tibot na Long, son of Granuaile (Grace O'Malley) and Richard de Burgo. Tibot was murdered and is buried in Ballintubber.

Burriscarra Abbey

Adam Staunton (whose family later assumed the name Mc Evilly) founded the Abbey at Burriscarra circa. 1298 for the Carmelites. In 1412 it was transferred by papal decree to the Augustinians who already had a friary in Ballinrobe. The remains of the present abbey are largely early 14th Century.